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Basketball is going virtual with NBA 2KVR and Gatorade

Hot on the heels of last week’s news about the Fitbit integration into NBA 2K17, 2K today announced that they will be embracing another “new” technology. The publisher is bringing basketball into the realm of virtual reality with NBA 2KVR Experience, the first virtual reality basketball game. Players will be able to join NBA 2K17 cover athlete and All-Star, Paul George, on the court at the Indiana Pacers’ stadium, Bankers Life Fieldhouse. As is typical with most VR experiences, the gameplay is limited to mini-games (but let’s face it, a full size VR basketball game will never work in your living room) which include a three-point shootout, a speed and accuracy skills challenge, and a buzzer beater countdown. A nice feature is that Paul George will also provide commentary and guide the player by offering tips to help improve their skills. Players can also earn a variety of Gatorade boosts that will aide their shooting acumen, speed, recovery and more to help reach the top of the leaderboards.

Coming from the cover star himself, Paul George stated that:

As a lifelong fan of NBA 2K, it’s exciting to see them take the leap into VR, and even more exciting that it’ll be on my home court. I can’t wait for fans to dominate on the virtual court with virtual help from Gatorade.

Greg Thomas, President of Visual Concepts, stated that:

Our team consistently looks for new ways to deliver unique, fun experiences for the gamer. NBA 2KVR will give fans even more access to our franchise and test new skills across entertaining VR challenges.

Exciting times for VR, and it is good to see established franchises embracing the “new” tech. NBA 2KVR Experience launches on the 22nd of November and will be coming to PlayStation VR, the HTC Vive and Samsung Gear VR.

 

 

Source :

Press release

Post Author: Rikus Le Roux

Rikus Le Roux
Knowledge and power are simply two sides of the same question: who decides what knowledge is, and who knows what needs to be decided? In the computer age, the question of knowledge is now more than ever a question of government.